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Home News Getting off tobacco road leads to renewed relief

Getting off tobacco road leads to renewed relief

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I always thought about quitting smoking. I hated the taste, the smell on my clothes, the constant coughing and belabored breathing. But I thought it made me feel better emotionally — even though I felt worse physically.

When I started smoking 16 years ago, at first it was just experimentation; then it became social and, as I got older, an established habit. I tried everything to quit — cinnamon, chewing gum, nicotine gum, smokeless tobacco, vaping — but they were all failed attempts. The most I would go without a cigarette was three weeks, and then I’d come up with an excuse for having one. “You only have one life; why not enjoy it,” “It’s just one cigarette,” or “It’s been a stressful day, I’ll start again tomorrow,” I’d tell myself.

Ties between the United States military and the tobacco industry trace back to the early 20th century. Reports show that during the Second World War, for example, cigarette advertisements praising service members were widespread on popular radio programs and in periodicals, and were even included as inserts in prepackaged meals.


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Did you know?

A veteran’s family must request a United States flag.

A flag is provided at no cost to drape the casket or accompany the urn of a deceased veteran. Generally, the flag is given to the next of kin. Only one flag may be provided per veteran. Upon the request of the family, an “Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes” (VA Form 21-2008) must be submitted along with a copy of the veteran’s discharge papers. Flags may be obtained from VA regional offices and most U.S. Post Offices.